“On Dreams,” Draft of Notes

These notes will be collected for Chapter IX of …”Toward a Philosophic psychology

That dreams are normally pleasant to have and recall indicates that they have a natural function. The pleasure is akin to self knowing and the highest liberal arts and studies. Though we never understand the dream, its apprehension and experience both serve some function, such as developing new regards for spiritual problems, reminding us of particulars neglected in the day, seeing doubts and hypotheses we have repressed, and the like.

“Dream memory” is different than waking memory. It sometimes arises as we return to sleep, like the stars at twilight.

Dreams do not usually draw on any scenes or even items directly from waking memory, as though it had no access.

Dreams are involuntary products of our own souls which are entirely invented from out of the dream memory rather than the waking memory.

Sometimes we remember snapshots on waking, sometimes the whole context, but dreams are almost always of the dreamer himself in some quasi real circumstance while he believes himself to be waking. The question then is why should the soul produce this experience- as each particular must have some cause.

That dreams are normally pleasant to have and recall indicates that they have a natural function. The pleasure is akin to self knowing and the highest liberal arts and studies. Though wee never understand the dream, its apprehension and experience both serve some function, such as developing new regards for spiritual problems, reminding us of particulars neglected in the day, seeing doubts and hypotheses we have repressed, and the like.

Freud began the modern study of the unconscious with his theory that the meaniong of a dream could be unraveled by looking for the sublimation of a wish by what he came to call the superego, an ethical faculty similar to conscience. Hence, the old Pauline understanding of the division in the soul between law and sin explains the wish and motive, appealing to the animal principle in man as natural while the human is thought entirely conventional. Jung accepts the understanding of these workings as a personal unconscious, going on to discuss what he calls the “collective ” unconscious,” pertaining to matters of love and knowledge. The link between these two levels of the soul is the anima and animus function active in matters of love. Symbols of collective as distinct from personal significance arise from the knowledge or archetypes” that is apparently in the soul of each, accounting for the universal similarities of symbols such as rebirth in the imaginative products of every “culture.” For example, to dream of a woman one knows is a personal content. To dream of a woman one does not know is anima.

The thought of Jung does not appeal to the animal as the only natural principle in the soul, but there is also the archetype of the “wise old man, for this the pursuit of wisdom and self-knowledge may be most natural. Hence we say that the better thinkers appeal to two natural principles of body and soul.

The dreams of Socrates are: Crito. Xenophon.

Apology on Dreams

Republic Book IX and the “Oedipus Complex.”

Republic VI-VII on imagination: the pool.

Dreams in scripture are:

Daniel 2 Nebuchadnezzar has a dream which his magicians fail to interpret. Daniel tells him both the dream and the interpretation.

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